Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Soldiers Tablet


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At some time the soldier table was moved from this location further down Academy Road to be installed farther down near the Civil War Monument. That must have been something to see.

Soldiers Tablet photo from glass plate negative

Names on tablet
Photo taken July 2016




More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Monday, January 30, 2017

Baptist Church


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The Baptist Church on Main Street was a popular subject for the postcards. I remember when the House of Pizza was in the basement and the video rental store was on the first floor. Dr. Fred Giaimo had his dentristy paractice here. After the pizza store left it was replaced by the restaurant Gram's Place run by the Kolapakko family. At one time the church was painted blue which was a bit jarring. Once again it is being used as a church, but it has quite a history.

Baptist Church Postcard

I wonder what camp is being referenced, bible camp?

Scan of the original glass plate negative of the Baptist Church

I took this photo in 2013 with an impending storm, The steeple has a bit of wear over the years.
Community Christian Church - July 2016

More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Sunday, January 29, 2017

River Road


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I've walked River Road many times, it is a wide road with no curves which make it safe for pedestrians. I like walking by Waterloom Pond and wetlands. This photo intrigues me because it references the "Willow Arches". Imagine what it was like to walk it back then.


More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Saturday, January 28, 2017

Souhegan Country Club


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The Souhegan Country Club was locate on Old Country Road in New Ipswich . This is one of the more popular postcards that is posted on social media showing the club house. Isn't that a great porch?


More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Friday, January 27, 2017

Mrs.Tabraham's Home


Isn't this a great wrap-around porch? The residence of Mrs.Tabraham from the collection of plate glass negatives. Blog reader Jane Askew Elwell added some additional information about the property:

Jane Askew Elwell That's my house! Built in 1830 but that porch was added in 1906. Sometime in the 50s it was removed again. Now it's back to its Greek Revival look on the corner of River Rd/Currier Rd. Mary Jane Marshall grew up opposite the house by the mill that isn't there now. Her father ran the mechanical part of the mill. She married Robert Tabraham, a Boston stock broker and 20 years her junior and they bought this house. He suddenly died in his very early 30s and she lived there for many years holding garden parties and teas.

Mrs.Tabraham's Home
In June of 2011 I was asked to take some photos of this home by Lisa Marie Petrie.
Lisa is a friend of Joe Biden and hosted a house party for him in New Ipswich when he was running for President in 2008. There was a chance that in 2011 that Vice President Biden might make a campaign stop in New Ipswich and Lisa wanted the photos to send to the Secret Service. I readily agreed but sadly the visit never happened.

June 2011 

View of the home from the back

Beautiful June day

The screen house

Living room

Lisa is a big fan of Marilyn Monroe as evidenced in the decor

No clutter



More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Thursday, January 26, 2017

The Parlor


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“Will you walk into my parlour?” said the Spider to the Fly, 'Tis the prettiest little parlour that ever you did spy; The way into my parlour is up a winding stair, And I've a many curious things to show when you are there.”
From a glass plate negative, a look back to a time before television and radio. 
The Parlor

More historic photos available on the 
New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Angelia with Lilacs


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Among the glass plate negatives there are only a few that feature people. The information on the protective sleeve for this photo was captioned "Angelia". She appears to be holding lilac flowers.

A little history about glass plate negatives:

Two types of glass plate negatives exist: the collodion wet plate invented by Frederick Scoff Archer, in use from the 1850s, and the silver gelatin dry plate created by Dr. Richard L. Maddox, in use from the 1870s. The wet plates were hand coated by photographers. The dry plates were easier to transport (though still heavy) and didn’t require as much exposure to light. Both processes are still in use by fine art photographers, for their great tonal range and detail, but back in the day they were commonplace for news photography.
Starting in the 1850s, collodion, a flammable liquid, was spread on a glass support, or plate, then placed into a bath of silver nitrate which turned the collodion into a photosensitive silver iodide. This process, including exposure and processing, had to happen immediately before the plate dried.
While the wet collodion process had a five-minute exposure time before the plate dried, the dry-plate negative allowed photographers to prepare their negatives in advance and develop images long after exposure.
 Source - Photography era of glass plate negatives
Angelia




More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Geotagging Photos


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Mobile phones and some digital cameras automatically add timestamps and geographic coordinates to photographs which a great tool for organization.

That is not the case when dealing with analog photography.  It is amazing how quickly one forgets where and when a photos was taken. The problem becomes even more difficult when working with century old glass negatives. However once they are digitized I am able to add geographic data to the image files. I use Google Maps to find that data.

Some places are easy to locate on Google Maps
I find the location on Google Maps, add a pin and the coordinates are displayed in the URL at the top of the screen.I copy those into the file to geotag the photo (42°45'12" N 71°51'28" W).

In Lightroom or other photo software, manually add coordinates from Google to the metadata field (on right in GPS field)
Once a photo has GPS data, it can be displayed in applications such as Google Photos, 500px, flickr and more.

Visit my website

Souhegan River


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A view of the Souhegan River taken 100 years ago. 

Souhegan River - Greenville

More historic photos available on the 
New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Monday, January 23, 2017

The Witch of Whittemore Hill & More



A look back at the house at the base of Whittemore Hill



There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy. Hamlet (1.5.167-8), Hamlet to Horatio

"There were several other dames who enjoyed the unenvia-
able reputation of being witches. One of them especially,
with her high cap, bible and yardstick, which she usually
carried with her, and which were regarded as her talismen,
was looked upon with superstitious awe, not only by the
youth of the neighborhood, but by some of the most pious and
venerable men and women too."
-
excerpt of text below
Click icon with outward facing arrows to open in a full screen. Search for Amos Whittemore on page 189.




Dr. Stillman Gibson - Farm and Residence


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Dr. Stillman Gibson lived in Ashby, Ma. until 1812, when he came to New Ipswich, living upon the Deacon Chandler farm. His later years were largely devoted to other duties than those of a farmer. From the treatment of diseases of domestic animals, in which he had been exceptionally successful, he past to those of his fellows, and gained such a reputation, especially in chronic ailments, that the number of patients coming from a distance caused his name to be placed upon many guideboards in the surrounding region.

Dr. Gibson was the son of Stephen Gibson Jr. and Rebecca Puffer, born Aug 22, 1781 and died September 4, 1864 - Source Find-A-Grave

Residence of Dr. Stillman Gibson 1850

Early photograph showing Dr. Stillman Gibson's farm

More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Waterfront Property


Wouldn't this be a great place to have a boat? If I could go back in time, I'd like to see where the photographer was standing when the photo was taken. I had no idea where this photo was taken but an alert reader informs us that this appears to be Waterloom Pond in New Ipswich, NH.
Heather Noyes wrote on Facebook (01/23/17) 
"From the boat drop kayak to the right and it might have been right there... there is nothing but a very old chimney there but it's location matches the pic"  
Barn and House on the water

More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Sunday, January 22, 2017

Mrs. Joseph Gibson


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Joseph Augustus Gibson (1812-1875) was a painter who lived in New Ipswich, NH. One of the glass plate negatives was captioned "Mrs. Joseph Gibson". I am making the assumption that her maiden name is Miranda M. Kibling. The Gibson's children formed a musical concert troupe known as the "Gibson Sisters". 
Source: The History of New Ipswich, N.H. 1735-1914, Charles Henry Chandler, p. 440. 
Miranda M. Kibling Gibson
Jan 27, 1813 - Jan 21, 1903

More historic photos available on the 
New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Saturday, January 21, 2017

New Ipswich View


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I'm always amazed to see the lack of trees in early photographs in New England. This is a view of fields in New Ipswich from what I'm guessing is the location of the country club. This plate had some notes on the sleeve stating Roebuck Plate, which I assume might be the photographer.

Roebuck Plate

View from bridge, but what bridge? Notice the apple trees


More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Friday, January 20, 2017

Railroad Bridge


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I'm a great fan of trains and railroads and was lucky enough to see a number of steam locomotives in operation when I traveled to China in 1985. I was curious about this photo scanned from a glass plate negative.  Sadly the title has been obscured.

The New Ipswich Library will be sponsoring a train talk with Dale Russell, a historian with a collection of over 14,000 photos. Details about the event can  be found on the Library Website.


Marcel Bernier has identified this photo as part of the Greenville Railroad Bridge built in 1907 after the wooden bridge burned in 1906.  Thank you for the information.


Railroad Bridge, Greenville, NH

More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Summer Day


A look back at a summer day sometime in the 1990s. I wonder if this house is still around. This is one of the glass plate negatives featuring locations in New Ipswich, NH.




More photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website
Also on their Facebook page

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Barn and Firewood


Glass plate negative predated film as the medium for photography. The plates were coated with an emulsion of light sensitive silver salts. What makes these plates ideal for digital scanning is that glass doesn't curl or bend. This photograph was in the collection of ones taken in New Ipswich. If you can identify the barn, please leave a comment.



Tuesday, January 17, 2017

Electric Power


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In the early twentieth century, electricity was generated from power plants on the Souhegan River. I am only aware of one that was located in Greenville, NH. I know that a penstock ran from Waterloom Pond to High Bridge in New Ipswich which produced power for the mill, however I am not sure if that was mechanical or electrical. I'd like to learn if these photos were taken locally. As with the other archival shots, I have no information about the date or location.

A generator or a motor?

This is one impressive flywheel
How much fun would it have been to see this in operation




Monday, January 16, 2017

Where in New Ipswich?


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Yesterday I posted some photos of Trap Falls that I took on January 15, 2017.  I decided it would be fun to jump back about a hundred years and post a similar photo of a waterfall in winter.  As with other early photographs there is no information available about the date or location. I'm guess that this might have been taken at Waterloom Pond in New Ipswich. I wonder if this dam was replaced with the spillway that is visible from River Road.




Sunday, January 15, 2017

Main Street, New Ipswich, New Hampshire


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One of my New Years resolutions was devoting more time and effort to my blogging effort. However I am off to a bad start with just a few entries for 2017.

While reviewing photos I had processed in June of 2016, I came across a series of scanned glass negatives that were used for postcards in the early twentieth century.  Some of these shots are easily recognizable such as this view of Main Street.

Main Street - New Ipswich, NH