Saturday, February 18, 2017

1 Leslie Lane

My Aunt Lillian and Uncle Ed lived in this home until their death. They raised four children. Recently while I was geotagging photos, I discovered that the Google Street view camera had captured an image of the house that was built on the same lot.
The Janis Home - 1944

Google Streetview of same property

Friday, February 17, 2017

The Fork in the Road


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Sadly I've come to the end of series of glass plate negatives taken in New Ipswich and the surrounding towns. Thanks to all of my readers who have assisted me with identifying properties shown in the photos. I plan to update some of the postings with recent photo whenever possible.

It seems fitting that the final image would be a fork in the road. 

No GPS when this photo was taken




More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Thursday, February 16, 2017

House and Barn


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I was taken with how contemporary this home looks, even though the photo was probably taken 100 years ago. The only thing missing is a driveway and power lines.
House and Barn
More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Sunday, February 12, 2017

The Group Photo


I've taken quite a few group photos and it is always a challenge to have everybody looking at the camera. This photographer almost succeeded. Have you noticed that folks didn't smile in these early photographs?
Family Group

More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Squirrel Resistant Feeder (Green Center Special)


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I've spent decades trying to keep squirrels off my bird feeders with little success. I've a had a variety of squirrel-proof feeders with little success including the one that would spin them around. That one would go haywire and spin wildly at random times. One of my feeders had a cantilevered perch and when I opened the top to add more seed a chipmunk jumped out. Eventually a bear ate it. I wired up my feeders to a fence charger which was successful until the squirrels started wearing little rubber boots.

I found this birdfeeder at the Green Center recycle center in New Ipswich and I can honestly say that that it highly effective. I don't believe any feeder can be 100% squirrel proof, but this one is great. I'm not sure if it will accommodate multiple heavier birds. It is well worth the zero cost.

I'll keep trying until I succeed

Maybe I can remove the top



Summer Day on the Porch


Winter storm Niko dumped 15 inches on New Ipswich, NH on Thursday, Feb 9, 2017.  We are expecting a new storm on Sunday into Monday. I'm growing weary of winter and would rather spend the day on this porch on a summer day.
Antique Photo




More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Friday, February 10, 2017

The House on Turnpike Road


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I've been posting these photos with the goal of learning more about the history of New Ipswich and identifying where they might have been taken. A member of the facebook group Life in New Ipswich identified her home in the photo below. It has a canted bay window and what appears to be a wooden swing. The bottom photo features the house.

Turnpike Road
House

More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Clark's Hotel


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Clark's Hotel in New Ipswich, NH
Surveyors in front of Clark's Hotel

Postcard

Clark's Hotel - corner of Main Street and Turnpike Road, New Ipswich

More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

New Ipswich Cottage


I've been posting these antique photos with the hope that my readers can identify the locations. My goal is add recent photos to match the old and new.


The Chandler Home - Smithville, NH

More historic photos available on the 
New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Tuesday, February 7, 2017

Finnish Churches


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Among the glass plate negatives were some images that did not appear to be taken in New Ipswich. Notes on the protective paper sleeve state "Finnish Church". Could these be churches in Finland?

Church

Church
More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Monday, February 6, 2017

Turnpike Road


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One of the more recognizable views of Turnpike Road is the view as one travels toward the center of New Ipswich.

Turnpike Road

More historic photos available on the 
New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Sunday, February 5, 2017

Under Repair


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A glass plate negative of a house and barn. It appears that a new chimney was just constructed. Note the missing windows.

House and barn






More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Saturday, February 4, 2017

Working at the Mill


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Among the mill photos I find this one the most intriguing, since it is probably what the workers at the mill must have seen as they arrived in the morning. I wonder if that bell (left side of frame) was used to mark the start of the work day.
New Ipswich Mill
More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Friday, February 3, 2017

New Ipswich Mill


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A view of a New Ipswich Mill. Note the open fields. This is a view of what is now Warwick Mills.
Updated information from New Ipswich Historical Society member Edward Rogers

"This is the mill on the present Warwick site that burned in 1872, having replaced a mill that burned around 1840. I believe the house on the left side, closest to the river is still there. I believe that steeple is part of the mill structure."

View of the Mill (Note lack of trees)
More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Thursday, February 2, 2017

The Grange (Union Hall)


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When I moved into New Ipswich in the early 1970s, this building was being used as a Grange. It fell into disrepair for several years but has been beautifully restored into apartments.

Union Hall - from scanned glass plate negative

Photo taken July 3, 2016

More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

New Ipswich Mill


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The Souhegan River provided power for the first textile mills in the state of New Hampshire. The first woolen mill was established in 1801 followed by the first cotton mill in 1804. No informaton exists for this scanned negative of a mill which has a leak in the roof.

Ed Rogers of the New Ipswich Historical Society has identified this as "Brown's Mill" also known as "#5 Mill" , it was located along the Souhegan River between Bank Village and Highbridge



More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Soldiers Tablet


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At some time the soldier table was moved from this location further down Academy Road to be installed farther down near the Civil War Monument. That must have been something to see.

Soldiers Tablet photo from glass plate negative

Names on tablet
Photo taken July 2016




More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Monday, January 30, 2017

Baptist Church


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The Baptist Church on Main Street was a popular subject for the postcards. I remember when the House of Pizza was in the basement and the video rental store was on the first floor. Dr. Fred Giaimo had his dentristy paractice here. After the pizza store left it was replaced by the restaurant Gram's Place run by the Kolapakko family. At one time the church was painted blue which was a bit jarring. Once again it is being used as a church, but it has quite a history.

Baptist Church Postcard

I wonder what camp is being referenced, bible camp?

Scan of the original glass plate negative of the Baptist Church

I took this photo in 2013 with an impending storm, The steeple has a bit of wear over the years.
Community Christian Church - July 2016

More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Sunday, January 29, 2017

River Road


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I've walked River Road many times, it is a wide road with no curves which make it safe for pedestrians. I like walking by Waterloom Pond and wetlands. This photo intrigues me because it references the "Willow Arches". Imagine what it was like to walk it back then.


More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Saturday, January 28, 2017

Souhegan Country Club


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The Souhegan Country Club was locate on Old Country Road in New Ipswich . This is one of the more popular postcards that is posted on social media showing the club house. Isn't that a great porch?


More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Friday, January 27, 2017

Mrs.Tabraham's Home


Isn't this a great wrap-around porch? The residence of Mrs.Tabraham from the collection of plate glass negatives. Blog reader Jane Askew Elwell added some additional information about the property:

Jane Askew Elwell That's my house! Built in 1830 but that porch was added in 1906. Sometime in the 50s it was removed again. Now it's back to its Greek Revival look on the corner of River Rd/Currier Rd. Mary Jane Marshall grew up opposite the house by the mill that isn't there now. Her father ran the mechanical part of the mill. She married Robert Tabraham, a Boston stock broker and 20 years her junior and they bought this house. He suddenly died in his very early 30s and she lived there for many years holding garden parties and teas.

Mrs.Tabraham's Home
In June of 2011 I was asked to take some photos of this home by Lisa Marie Petrie.
Lisa is a friend of Joe Biden and hosted a house party for him in New Ipswich when he was running for President in 2008. There was a chance that in 2011 that Vice President Biden might make a campaign stop in New Ipswich and Lisa wanted the photos to send to the Secret Service. I readily agreed but sadly the visit never happened.

June 2011 

View of the home from the back

Beautiful June day

The screen house

Living room

Lisa is a big fan of Marilyn Monroe as evidenced in the decor

No clutter



More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Thursday, January 26, 2017

The Parlor


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“Will you walk into my parlour?” said the Spider to the Fly, 'Tis the prettiest little parlour that ever you did spy; The way into my parlour is up a winding stair, And I've a many curious things to show when you are there.”
From a glass plate negative, a look back to a time before television and radio. 
The Parlor

More historic photos available on the 
New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Angelia with Lilacs


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Among the glass plate negatives there are only a few that feature people. The information on the protective sleeve for this photo was captioned "Angelia". She appears to be holding lilac flowers.

A little history about glass plate negatives:

Two types of glass plate negatives exist: the collodion wet plate invented by Frederick Scoff Archer, in use from the 1850s, and the silver gelatin dry plate created by Dr. Richard L. Maddox, in use from the 1870s. The wet plates were hand coated by photographers. The dry plates were easier to transport (though still heavy) and didn’t require as much exposure to light. Both processes are still in use by fine art photographers, for their great tonal range and detail, but back in the day they were commonplace for news photography.
Starting in the 1850s, collodion, a flammable liquid, was spread on a glass support, or plate, then placed into a bath of silver nitrate which turned the collodion into a photosensitive silver iodide. This process, including exposure and processing, had to happen immediately before the plate dried.
While the wet collodion process had a five-minute exposure time before the plate dried, the dry-plate negative allowed photographers to prepare their negatives in advance and develop images long after exposure.
 Source - Photography era of glass plate negatives
Angelia




More historic photos available on the New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Geotagging Photos


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Mobile phones and some digital cameras automatically add timestamps and geographic coordinates to photographs which a great tool for organization.

That is not the case when dealing with analog photography.  It is amazing how quickly one forgets where and when a photos was taken. The problem becomes even more difficult when working with century old glass negatives. However once they are digitized I am able to add geographic data to the image files. I use Google Maps to find that data.

Some places are easy to locate on Google Maps
I find the location on Google Maps, add a pin and the coordinates are displayed in the URL at the top of the screen.I copy those into the file to geotag the photo (42°45'12" N 71°51'28" W).

In Lightroom or other photo software, manually add coordinates from Google to the metadata field (on right in GPS field)
Once a photo has GPS data, it can be displayed in applications such as Google Photos, 500px, flickr and more.

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Souhegan River


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A view of the Souhegan River taken 100 years ago. 

Souhegan River - Greenville

More historic photos available on the 
New Ipswich Historical Society website 
Also on their Facebook page

Monday, January 23, 2017

The Witch of Whittemore Hill & More



A look back at the house at the base of Whittemore Hill



There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, Than are dreamt of in your philosophy. Hamlet (1.5.167-8), Hamlet to Horatio

"There were several other dames who enjoyed the unenvia-
able reputation of being witches. One of them especially,
with her high cap, bible and yardstick, which she usually
carried with her, and which were regarded as her talismen,
was looked upon with superstitious awe, not only by the
youth of the neighborhood, but by some of the most pious and
venerable men and women too."
-
excerpt of text below
Click icon with outward facing arrows to open in a full screen. Search for Amos Whittemore on page 189.